Experimental Research

(Updated on 2 Jan 2014)

This area of project work emphasizes the following process skills: Thinking, Questioning, Recording, Checking, Testing, Measuring, Analyzing, Estimating, Predicting, Observing, Tabulating, Graphing, and Comparing. The specific process skills used will depend on the purpose and hypothesis of your project.

A research strategy would typically involve each of the following:

A. STATEMENT OF PURPOSE AND HYPOTHESIS
Briefly describe or define your topic. What do you want to find out? State what you think will happen in a hypothesis.

B. MATERIALS AND METHODS
How will you test your hypothesis? List all the materials you will need. Identify all variables (Controlled, Independent, Dependent). Explain how your research is to be conducted in a "step by step" fashion with sufficient details so that other researchers can replicate it.

C. COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS OF DATA
What types of data are required? How do you record them? How do you ensure reliable and accurate data are collected? What did the data you collected indicate about what happened in your research project? Include all data here in a suitable chart/graph/table. What did your chart/graph/table and statistical analysis show? This is especially important with regards to your hypothesis!

D. SUMMARY AND CONCLUSION
What did you find? What does your analysis of data indicate? State whether you accepted or rejected your hypothesis. Why? How do your findings compare to those of other researchers'?

E. APPLICATIONS
How will your research findings help people solve problems or make the world a better place to live? How could your findings be used to further explore your area of research?

Adapted from: http://youth.net/nsrc/call.html


PROTOCOLS AND CONDITIONS FOR SUBMISSION FOR PROJECT JUDGING AT VARIOUS STAGES

1. Scores from each round of judging is not cumulative.

2. All semi-finalists must submit a web-report which makes up 15% of the Independent study score. The components of a Cat-1 web-report are:
  • abstract ( good summary of the main idea investigated, the method(s) employed, the results obtained and conclusion/implications of findings)
  • introduction and literature review (includes background information that relates to the research area with proper in-text citation)
  • materials and methods (procedures should be clear and outlined sequentially; procedure is logical with no major errors).
  • results and discussion (sufficient and relevant data; raw data are presented in the form of table/graphs; data treated with statistical methods where appropriate)
  • conclusion (draws inference(s) from data to support/refute hypothesis; infuses background readings with appropriate interpretation of data; possible sources of errors and limitations addressed as appropriate)
  • further work
  • references (at least 5 credible references, cited in APA format).

3. All semi-finalists must also submit a reflection. Access the document for tips on writing a good reflection.



DIFFERENT ROUNDS OF JUDGING

Preliminary round
  • 5 min presentation
  • Project proposed must be feasible.
  • Refer to rubric for all the components required.

Semi-final round
  • 7 min presentation
  • Emphasis will be placed on sound methods and thorough data analysis.
  • Refer to rubric for all the components required.

Final round
  • 10 min presentation
  • Emphasis will be placed on sound and thorough data analysis and discussion/conclusion.
  • Refer to rubric for all the components required.


JUDGING CRITERIA

RUBRICS
(updated on 2 Jan 2014)

Overall grading


Prelim


Semi-finals


Finals



Important forms to be submitted to SRC




Resources needed to complete risk assessment forms





Briefing slides

Proposal training on 7 March 2014


Briefing on 2 May 2014